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MIT Admissions

Brain and Cognitive Sciences

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MIT Undergraduate Departments
Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Course 9
Programs Offered: Major, Double Major, Minor
Department Head: Mriganka Sur
Department Headquarters: 46-6237
Undergraduate Administrator: Susan Lanza
Undergraduate Office: 46-2005R
UROP Coordinator: Pawan Sinha
Website: http://bcs.mit.edu/

Brain and Cognitive Sciences, otherwise known as Course 9, is a department in MIT's School of Science. The department encompasses the fields of neuroscience, cognitive science, and psychology. There is a strong focus on computational methods.

Course 9 is a very flexible major, so students can choose to take courses based on what interests them. Almost all Course 9 undergrads participate in research, typically as a UROP.

Contents

Major Requirements

The Course 9 major requirements are as follows.

Required subjects

All of these subjects must be taken. As of January 2012, 9.01 and 9.07 are offered only in the fall, and 9.00 is offered only in the spring.

  • 9.00 Introduction to Psychology (12 units, HASS)
  • 9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (12 units, REST)
  • 9.07 Statistics for Brain and Cognitive Science (12 units)

Lab/Research

Two lab/research classes must be taken. At least one must come from this list:

  • 9.02 Systems Neuroscience Laboratory (12 units, Institute lab, CI-M)
  • 9.12 Experimental Molecular Neurobiology (12 units, Institute lab, CI-M)
  • 9.61 Laboratory in Higher-Level Cognition (12 units, Institute lab, CI-M)
  • 9.63 Laboratory in Visual Cognition (12 units, Institute lab, CI-M)

The second one may come from the above list or this list:

  • 9.URG Undergraduate Research (12 units, UROP)
  • 9.41 Topics in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (18 units, CI-M)
  • 9.50 Research in Brain and Cognitive Sciences (12 units, Institute lab)

Core

Six core subjects must be taken, with the only restriction being that they cannot all be from the same one of the following three categories.

Cognitive Science:

  • 9.34 Sensory and Social Orders (9 units)
  • 9.37 Anigrafs(9 units)
  • 9.56 Abnormal Language (12 units)
  • 9.57 Language Acquisition (12 units, HASS-S)
  • 9.59 Psycholinguistics (12 units, HASS-S)
  • 9.65 Cognitive Processes (12 units, HASS-S)
  • 9.66 Computational Cognitive Science (12 units)
  • 9.85 Infant and Early Childhood Cognition (12 units, HASS-S, CI-M)
  • 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (12 units, HASS-S, CI-H)

Cognitive Neuroscience:

  • 9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (12 units)
  • 9.20 Animal Behavior (12 units, HASS-S)
  • 9.22 A Clinical Approach to the Human Brain (12 units)
  • 9.35 Sensation and Perception (12 units)
  • 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (12 units, CI-M)

Neuroscience:

  • 9.03 Neural Basis of Learning and Memory (12 units)
  • 9.04 Neural Basis of Vision and Audition (12 units)
  • 9.05 Neural Basis of Movement (12 units)
  • 9.09 Cellular Neurobiology (12 units)
  • 9.14 Brain Structure and Its Origins (12 units)
  • 9.15 Biochemistry and Pharmacology of Synaptic Transmission (12 units)
  • 9.18 Developmental Neurobiology (12 units, CI-M)
  • 9.24 Diseases of the Nervous System (12 units)
  • 9.29 Introduction to Computational Neuroscience (12 units)
  • 9.31 The Neurophysiology of Memory (12 units)

Electives

Two additional courses must be taken, either Course 9 classes or other relevant ones.

People

Notable Professors

  • Susumu Tonegawa, Nobel Laureate, Physiology/Medicine 1987

Official (External) Links

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